dog hospital staten island
In response to our clients needs we have decided to extend our hours again! Starting February 1st we have extended our weekend hours on Saturday and Sunday from 8am to 6pm. We hope by doing so we can provide the highest standard of care to our patients.
When your cat sees you it will walk over to you and flop over on its back, exposing its belly to you. What does this position mean and what is your cat trying to tell you? Your Staten Island cat hospital can give you more insight into cat behavior, but here is a quick explanation of this odd feline body position.

The Meaning Behind the Belly-Up Pose - From your Staten Island Cat Hospital

Staten Island Cat Hospital

photo credit: Runs With Scissors via photopin cc

Many people think that the belly up position is a sign of submission and if we were talking about dogs it certainly would be. However, when it comes to cats things are a little bit different. In felines, the belly up position is actually more of a defensive move. When your cat is lying on its back, it is able to attack with all four of its sharp clawed paws as well as its pointy teeth. If anyone tries to touch the cat in this position, they are ready to fight back. This explains why, when you go to give your kitty a belly-rub, she tends to kick and bite you. It might seem like she is giving you mixed signals, but she really isn’t! However, sometimes a cat will take on the belly-up position when they are feeling playful. Your furry friend is telling you that he wants to play a game and doesn’t mean any offense by the gesture. How can you tell the difference between this and the defensive position? Of course, you will know the moods of your cat best and you can rely on the context of the situation to give you clues. A good hint from your Staten Island cat hospital is to look at the position of your kitty’s ears. If they are flattened back against the cat’s head, this is a sign that he is feeling defensive and ready to attack. If they are up and facing forward, your kitty is ready to play. For more hints and information about cat behavior, contact your Staten Island cat hospital.